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How the CEO of Amex is dealing with the new rules of the financial crisis.
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It's probably cold comfort, but Goldman Sachs couldn't have done it without your help.
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With the Dow careening towards 10,000 and earnings season generating some pleasant surprises, stock values are higher than they've been in a year. So can value investors still make money in this environment?
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I've written a lot about car companies since I started covering business in the 1960s, but I've written very little about cars, because they just don't interest me much.
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Here's another sign of a sickly banking sector: a flurry of letters urging banks to raise money -- and fast.
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There's an irony afoot on the African continent. After years of state control of their economies, African governments are opening up to foreign business as never before.
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Just after 9 a.m. on a humid Friday in late September, the trustees of Auburn University gather in a campus hotel conference room for their first meeting of the new school year. Even this early in the day there's a bit of electricity in the air. It is football season, it's a home-game weekend, and expectations are running high.
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If Congress won't get the job done on climate change, President Obama has a way to do it himself. But is he strong-arming the legislative branch?
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IBM (IBM) is pushing more of its technology into trains.
The company has announced today that transit agencies in New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. will use its Maximo software to monitor the health of rail cars, bridges, tunnels, tracks and other assets, and flag them for maintenance before they break down.
Ken Donnelly, worldwide Maximo industry lead, at IBM, says the $100 million transit maintenance market turns out to be a relatively healthy area in a troubled global economy. Even though budgets are tight, governments are eager to find more efficient ways to keep trans
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it equipment in working order without overpaying for inspections or for emergency work when systems fail. And the market seems likely to stay healthy, since many countries have targeted their economic stimulus dollars toward public transit.
Asset management software like Maximo can track how equipment is being serviced, and compare that against a recommended maintenance schedule. As newer trains come equipped with sensors that monitor specific functions – say, doors that open and close – the software can learn that a train’s doors typically malfunction after opening, say, 10,000 times, and schedule them for maintenance after they reach the 9,500 mark.
The transit agencies using the software are the Long Island Rail Road in New York, Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area, and Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in D.C.
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What to do with Wall Street's gluttonous gatekeepers?